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Breads

German Sweet Christmas Bread

January 6, 2017
German Christmas Bread, Christbrot Recipe | Fake Food Free

 

It’s a rare for me to find one holiday recipe that I make over and over every year. I’m not against tradition, it’s just that there are so many candies, cakes, and cookies topping my favorites list that if I made each one, I’d have enough to last us right up until the next holiday season.

So I have to pick and choose. 

That has started to change a little bit, though, as we’ve traveled abroad over Christmas and I’ve discovered traditional foods of other countries. It began with Danish Butter Cookies after visiting Copenhagen. I’ve made them a whopping two years in a row and I don’t see them dropping off the list anytime soon. 

Since we’ve visited Austria and Germany at Christmas I’ve found a few favorites from there as well. Actually, my love of stollen started way back when I worked in a bakery and we used to make a modified version at the holidays. I’ve been searching for a good recipe ever since, but I end up running out of time to give it a try before the holiday hits. 

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Roasted Garlic Dinner Rolls

December 19, 2014

Give your holiday meals a creative twist this year with these garlic dinner rolls! Tucked inside the layers is a spread of slow roasted garlic, shredded Parmesan cheese and rich butter.

 Roasted Garlic Dinner Rolls | Fake Food Free #bread #homemade #recipe

When I stand in front a table of holiday foods with an empty plate, I start negotiating with myself. I can’t possibly eat it all, so what is it that I can cut out to reduce volume that I also won’t miss much?

 Rolls. It’s always the rolls.

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Krakow Christmas Market

December 10, 2014

Our holiday visit didn’t stop in Vienna. The Krakow Christmas Market in Poland was equally as exciting with one of a kind food experiences!

                                     Krakow Christmas Market | Fake Food Free #travel #christmas #Poland 

As I stand in the town center of Krakow, I wonder why a visit to Poland had not been higher on my travel list. It was always there, but tucked beneath what I thought were more intriguing destinations.

I take my first steps into the market and I see a stand selling pierogi. No surprise there. I am in Poland after all.

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Chickpea and Quinoa Griddle Cakes with Spinach and Feta

November 7, 2014

These chickpea and quinoa griddle cakes are made with chickpea and quinoa flours. Spiced with curry powder, they are topped with sautéed spinach and feta cheese. 

 Chickpea and Quinoa Griddle Cakes with Spinach and Feta | Fake Food Free

I’ve been experimenting with socca a lot over the past year. In case you are unfamiliar (like I was just a year ago), socca is a snack made with chickpea flour and water. To me, it’s a cross between a tortilla and a crepe.

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Swedish Crisp Bread with Cumin from Tina Nordström’s Scandinavian Cooking

May 15, 2014
Swedish Crisp Bread with Cumin from Tina Nordström’s Scandinavian Cooking | Fake Food Free

Unless you count frequently visiting the IKEA marketplace and staying well stocked in lingonberry jam, I have little experience with Scandinavian cuisine. Had the opportunity for more experiences arisen, I would have snatched them up as it’s an area of the world that has always intrigued me, and one that has been on our travel list for a while. It’s just that even in this diverse food scene that I now live in, Scandinavian still doesn’t top the list of well-marketed options.

When I saw Tina Nordström’s Scandinavian Cooking I knew I needed a copy for my cookbook shelf. What a unique addition! I can safely say that I have nothing like this book in my collection. It not only fills a cuisine void, it is also a pretty outstanding cookbook.

Tina is a Swedish celebrity chef, host of the PBS show New Scandinavian Cooking and author of several cookbooks. This book, which she describes as the most comprehensive book that she has written, is speckled with family photos, letters and personal essays that give you a peek into her life. It’s comfortable style makes you feel as if you are in the kitchen cooking with her or dining at her family table. It’s an intimate feeling that you don’t get from many cookbooks.

After feeling at home as a result of the intro, next I was drawn in the by the food photos. They are exactly how I love them – moody and intriguing with a classic comfort that makes you feel happier by simply viewing them.

Next the recipes were there to educate me. It wasn’t enough to see the delicious titles. I just had to read the intros and ingredient lists to see what the food was all about. The book is a true lesson in Scandinavian cooking. I learned so much. Especially that the cuisine goes far beyond fish and my beloved lingonberries.

Whenever I explore new foods, I always go straight to the bread. I’d like to think that it’s not because I like carbohydrates so much. I’d rather think that it’s because breads, crackers or buns and rolls of some form or another tend to be at the foundation of so many cuisines (and if it isn’t bread it’s often rice or noodles).

That’s the first reason why the Swedish Crisp Bread with Cumin caught my attention. The second, was all the flavors. Yogurt, cumin and anise in a flatbread-like crisp? Sign me up!

I can’t stop gushing over the great flavors in this recipe. The tang of the yogurt with the spices is unlike any crisp bread or cracker I’ve had before.

Swedish Crisp Bread with Cumin from Tina Nordström’s Scandinavian Cooking | Fake Food Free

I didn’t get mine rolled out quite as thin as the version pictured in the book, so on the second round of baking I decided to cut them into squares to create crackers. It worked great. Either way they are delicious.  (I paired them with a quick spread of thick sour cream and herbs from the pantry.)

If your shelf has a void when it comes to Scandinavian cuisine, this is the cookbook you want to fill it with.

Swedish Crisp Bread with Cumin

Excerpted with permission from Tina Nordström’s Scandinavian Cooking: Simple Recipes for Home-Style Scandinavian Cooking by Tina Nordström. Photographs by Charlie Drevstam. Copyright, 2014. Skyhorse Publishing, Inc. 

From the book:
I think it’s easier to bake crisp bread in a frying pan. It’s quite traditional and delicious with gravlax and some lemon mayonnaise (see page 92). Or try some green pea guacamole (see page 252). You can even break the crisp bread into a bowl of tomato soup.

30–35 CRISP BREADS
3 cups (700 ml) wheat flour
1 1/4 cups (300 ml) rye flour
1 1/4 cups (300 ml) yogurt
1/2 cup (100 ml) olive oil
2 tsp baking powder
1 tbsp salt
6 tbsp ground cumin
2 tbsp ground anise seeds

DIRECTIONS:
1. Mix all ingredients into a smooth dough.
2. Roll the dough out into flat pieces and bake them for about 4–5 minutes per side in either a cast iron frying pan without any grease or oil, or in the oven at 425ºF (225ºC) on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper.
3. Store the crisp bread in a metal box in a dry location.

Swedish Crisp Bread with Cumin from Tina Nordström’s Scandinavian Cooking | Fake Food Free

Disclosure: This book was sent to me for review purposes. I was not required to write about it and received no compensation for doing so. 

 
Thanks for reading! All images and content are the property of Fake Food Free unless otherwise stated. Please do not republish full recipes and images without written permission. What is okay? Feel free to Pin images, share links to my posts or share the photo in a round up post with the title of this recipe and a link back to the post. Confused about copyright and food blogs? Here is some helpful information on Recipe Attribution. If you want to use a photo or full recipe, just ask. I’m sure we can work something out.

Savory Profiteroles with Asparagus and Goat Cheese Recipe

April 16, 2014

Back in early March we vacationed in Antigua. It was our second trip there and I highly recommend it — gorgeous island, friendly people and outstanding food and drink. I did a post on the food highlights from our last trip, but this time I brought back some ideas to recreate in my own kitchen.

We’re no strangers to digging into the local foods, but often the resorts where we stay come up with some delicious things as well. I spotted these profiteroles on the menu our first night and I was bound and determined to try them before the trip was over.

Not only did I want to try them, I knew as soon as I spotted them (and I’m pretty sure I said it out loud to my husband) – that’s what I’m making with the goat cheese!

Right before we left for the trip, I received a package overflowing with products from Redwood Hill Farm in Sebastopol, Calif. A Certified Humane goat dairy, Redwood Hill Farm is a small family farm that has been producing goat milk products since 1968.

My generous package contained — Chèvre (including roasted chile chèvre!), Bucheret, Camellia (camembert), raw milk feta, goat milk yogurt in flavors like apricot mango and mango orange pineapple kefir. I also received some lactose-free products from their sister company, Green Valley Organics – yogurt, kefir and sour cream.

The kefirs have made a delicious addition to breakfast and those aged goat cheeses have been a true treat for the cheese plates my husband and I like to snack on over the weekend. But let’s talk about this chèvre.

First of all, I have not seen it in re-sealable packaging like this, and I love it! Usually I’m dealing with the log wrapped in messy plastic that is a pain to store in the fridge. This makes it so much easier to keep the fridge stocked.

Unlike the other treats that have been a joy to eat and drink as they are, I wanted to make some with the chèvre. When I saw those profiteroles on our trip, I knew that was it. I had the goat cheese and we were coming into asparagus season. Perfect.

These profiteroles are the answer to the traditional finger sandwich. I would take this light, puffed pastry filled with goat cheese over a roll with ham salad any day. They are also easy to make. I know puffy baked things can be intimidating, but even with my past baking challenges, I can make profiteroles without fail. They are not at all as complicated as they seem. Promise.

Redwood Hill Farm chèvre is ideal for this recipe because it has a creamy, almost whipped texture. It blends well with the steamed asparagus. Speaking of the asparagus, be sure to steam it until it is almost mushy and then chop it before adding it to the food processor. This will ensure the asparagus purees and blends into the goat cheese so you have a smooth filling.

Savory Profiteroles with Asparagus and Goat Cheese

Makes: 12 profiteroles

Ingredients:

Profiteroles
1 cup water
½ cup unsalted butter
¼ tsp salt
1 cup white whole wheat flour
4 eggs

Filling
6 stalks asparagus, steamed and chopped
8 oz. chèvre
2 tbsp chopped fresh chives
¼ tsp salt
1/8 tsp ground black pepper

Prep:

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

Add the water, butter and salt to a medium sauce pan. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat.

As soon as it comes to a rolling boil, stir in the flour and reduce the heat. Continue to stir vigorously until a smooth dough is formed. Remove from the heat.

Stir in the eggs. Stir quickly until they are completely mixed in and the mixture returns to a soft dough.

Use a tablespoon to scoop and drop the dough onto the baking sheet to make 12 large profiteroles. You can also use a pastry bag to pipe the dough onto the baking sheet.

Bake for 22 to 25 minutes, until they are puffed and golden brown. Let cool completely.

To make the filling, combine the asparagus and chèvre in a small food processor. Pulse until combined into a smooth green spread. Transfer to a bowl and stir in the chives, salt and pepper.

Use a serrated knife to cut open each profiterole like a bun. Spread an even amount of the goat cheese filling inside each profiterole and serve.

Disclosure:  The products mentioned in this post were provided by Redwood Hill Farm. I was not required to post about them and received no compensation for doing so.

 

Thanks for reading! All images and content are the property of Fake Food Free unless otherwise stated. Please do not republish full recipes and images without written permission. What is okay? Feel free to Pin images, share links to my posts or share the photo with the title of this recipe and a link back to the post. Confused about copyright and food blogs? Here is some helpful information on Recipe Attribution. If you want to use a photo or full recipe, just ask. I’m sure we can work something out. 

Sourdough Stuffing with Artichokes and Sundried Tomatoes Recipe

November 5, 2013
Stuffing is my favorite dish on the holiday table! This recipe for sourdough stuffing combines local flavors with a traditional favorite.
 Sourdough Stuffing with Artichokes and Sundried Tomatoes | Fake Food Free

When I first started thinking about this year’s Thanksgiving menu (and believe me, I’ve been thinking about it a while), I was set on traditional. I didn’t cook at all last year. I was visiting my husband here in California, in the midst of our move, and we ate Thanksgiving dinner at a local restaurant.

Knowing this year would be different, I started planning early. Sweet potato casserole, my usual cranberry pecan stuffing — it had all been penciled in. But then I considered all the new ingredients I have access to. It seemed silly not to take full advantage and incorporate them into some new traditions.

So I’ve shifted gears a bit. There will still be some old favorites, like my grandmother’s pumpkin pie. But otherwise, I want avocados, artichokes, dates and figs to make an appearance. I’ve never had such access to these foods and it seems to me they should fit right in with what we are used to this time of year.

I’ve been experimenting a little so that the big day isn’t a big fail. My first challenge was the stuffing (my favorite thing on the menu, next to cranberry sauce).

It had to be sourdough. No exceptions. Then I came across some California sundried tomatoes and I thought they would be the perfect partner for the artichoke hearts I’d been considering.

Sourdough Stuffing with Artichokes and Sundried Tomatoes | Fake Food Free

The result? What a winner! The sweet sundried tomatoes and the tart artichoke hearts were meant to be with the tangy sourdough. I don’t always add an egg white to my stuffing, but this time I was glad I did. It created a soft, but solid center that was balanced by the crispy, crunchy edges on top.

I may not go back to my old favorite. Or I might have to start making two stuffings. I haven’t decided yet.

Sourdough Stuffing with Artichokes and Sundried Tomatoes

Makes: 4 servings

Ingredients

1 ½ tbsp olive oil
½ cup red onion, chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tbsp finely chopped sundried tomatoes
3 canned, unseasoned artichoke hearts, chopped (marinated would work, but it may add a different flavor)
3 ½ cups toasted sourdough bread cubes (I cut my own from a stale loaf and broiled for about 5 minutes)
1 ¼ cups vegetable stock
1/8 ground black pepper
1/8 tsp poultry seasoning
¼ – ½ tsp salt
1 egg white

Prep

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Lightly grease a 1 quart casserole dish or loaf pan with your oil of choice.

Heat the olive oil in a medium skillet on medium-high heat. Add the onion and garlic. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 4 minutes, until the onion begins to soften.

Add the sundried tomatoes and artichoke hearts. Cook for 1 more minute. Turn off the heat.

Place the bread cubes in a large bowl. Add the cooked vegetables. Add the vegetable stock a little at a time as you stir the stuffing. Continue to stir until the bread cubes are well saturated.

Stir in the black pepper and poultry seasoning. Add the ¼ to ½ teaspoon of salt to taste (you may need less if your stock is salted).

Once you’ve added the right amount of salt, stir in the egg white. Continue to stir until it is incorporated into the stuffing.

Transfer the stuffing to the baking dish. Press it gently into the dish to smooth the surface.

Bake for 20 minutes, until the edges are browned and the top has a nice golden color. Serve warm.

Sourdough Stuffing with Artichokes and Sundried Tomatoes | Fake Food Free

Thanks for reading! All images and content are the property of Fake Food Free unless otherwise stated. Please do not republish full recipes and images without written permission. What is okay? Feel free to Pin images, share links to my posts or share the photo in a round up post with the title of this recipe and a link back to the post. Confused about copyright and food blogs? Here is some helpful information on Recipe Attribution. If you want to use a photo or full recipe, just ask. I’m sure we can work something out. 

Avocado Pound Cake with Blood Orange Glaze Recipe

March 1, 2013
Avocado Pound Cake with Blood Orange Glaze | Fake Food Free


I started the New Year off with a sense of adventure. After a long break from blogging due to our move, I was ready to jump right into some baking experiments. 

I did. And I failed. 

For a few weeks our apartment was filled with dry, gritty donuts and collapsed cakes. So I claimed 2013 the year of cooking, not baking. 

But then I got the bug again. The kind of bug that sees an avocado sitting on the counter and wonders if I can use it in place of butter or oil in a recipe. Not that I don’t fully embrace butter. I was simply up for a challenge. 

The first challenge was getting the right consistency. After blending the avocado and mixing it with sugar, eggs and flour I seemed to be on the right track. It even looked pretty when I took it out of the oven.

Avocado Pound Cake with Blood Orange Glaze
The next challenge was getting it out of the pan. Even though the avocado has a good amount of fat, I was using a non-stick pan and I greased it, given my track record, I wasn’t hopeful. I’m pretty sure I cheered when it slid right out of the pan.

Avocado Pound Cake with Blood Orange Glaze | Fake Food Free
 
The final result? You can replace the butter or oil with avocado. At least with this recipe you can. I ended up with a dense, sweet pound cake, with a tiny hint of avocado flavor and a burst of citrus from the glaze. 
 

Avocado Pound Cake with Blood Orange Glaze

Makes: 6 to 8 servings

Ingredients

1 avocado, peeled and pitted, pureed
1 cup raw sugar (turbinado or Demerara)
¼ cup mascavo sugar (you might be able to substitute brown sugar)
2 large eggs
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
½ teaspoon baking powder
¼ teaspoon salt
1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour
 
Glaze
1 tablespoon blood orange juice
½ teaspoon orange zest
5 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar 
 
Prep
 
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Grease a small loaf pan. I used a mini loaf pan, the size that comes with a 4 piece set. The cake expands so this was easily enough for 6 to 8 slices once it was baked. 
 
Add the pureed avocado, the raw sugar and the mascavo sugar to the bowl of a mixer. Beat on medium for about 45 seconds. Add the eggs and beat for about 30 seconds. Mix in the vanilla. 
 
Add the baking powder and salt. Slowly mix in the flour just until all ingredients are combined. 
 
Pour the batter into the prepared baking pan. Place the pan on a baking sheet. Bake for 40 to 45 minutes, or until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean.
 
This is a dense pound cake so make sure to use the knife test to ensure it is baked through. The top of the bread will darken quite a bit.
 
Place the loaf pan on a cooling rack to cool for about 10 minutes. Remove the cake from the pan and allow to cool completely.
 
In a small dish, stir together the glaze ingredients, adding the powdered sugar one tablespoon at a time. You might decide you like a thinner or thicker consistency, so add more or less sugar to your liking. 
 
Poor the glaze over the cooled pound cake and let set before slicing and serving. 

Avocado Pound Cake with Blood Orange Glaze | Fake Food Free
Thanks for reading! All images and content are the property of Fake Food Free unless otherwise stated. Please do not republish full recipes and images without written permission. What is okay? Feel free to Pin images, share links to my posts or share the photo in a round up post with the title of this recipe and a link back to the post. Confused about copyright and food blogs? Here is some helpful information on Recipe Attribution. If you want to use a photo or full recipe, just ask. I’m sure we can work something out.  
 

Page Tangerine Walnut Muffins Recipe

January 22, 2013
Page Tangerine Walnut Muffins Recipe | Fake Food Free

One change that goes along with living in the Bay Area is that I can no longer complain about the endless cold days of January and February. No, no complaining here. In fact, you can’t get much closer to perfect for me. Sunshine and jacket weather, nicely balanced with a gloomy day that requires a scarf and maybe gloves.

I’ve always considered citrus season a bright spot in a long, dreary winter. Now it’s a bonus during an already enjoyable time of year. And wow, did I completely underestimated how amazing citrus season would be around here!

California Oranges

I’m not unfamiliar with regular access to amazing oranges. I had my pick of them when we lived in Brazil, but four varieties of oranges, mandarins, tangerines, lemons and sweet limes is a whole new ball game. We’ve purchased so much the past two weekends, we can barely carry them back to our apartment. Yet the fruit basket is completely empty come the following Saturday.

California Citrus

I’m incredible picky about my citrus. Mainly the seeds and tough membranes. It’s such an issue for me that I still serve my oranges old school cafeteria-style, sliced in quarters and eaten like a fourth grader. I’ve just now come around to the peel-and-eat citrus like mandarins, if they are small, tender and sweet.

Last week I was introduced to a new favorite that meets all my criteria – Page Tangerines. They are a cross of clementines and minneolas (tangelos). They are unbelievably sweet and tender. Some people at the Farmer’s Market stall complained that they are a little hard to peel, but I didn’t mind this too much.

Page Tangerines, a cross of clementines and minneolas (tangelos). | Page Tangerine Walnut Muffins Recipe | Fake Food Free
California Citrus | Ferry Building Farmers Market, San Francisco | Fake Food Free

Given that I can’t seem to control myself, and always buy way too much citrus, I decided to use some in muffins this past weekend. Along with the sweet citrus, I added walnuts for a little crunch and a sprinkle of raw sugar on the top.

Page Tangerine Walnut Muffins Recipe

Makes: 12 muffins

Ingredients:
2 cups white whole wheat flour
3 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1/3 cup raw sugar
3/4 cup milk
1/3 cup olive oil
1 large egg, beaten
1 tsp vanilla
3-4 Page tangerines, peeled and finely chopped
1 tsp Page tangerine zest
1/3 cup chopped walnuts
Raw sugar to top the muffins

Prep:
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees and grease the bottom of each muffin tin. Sift together the flour, baking powder and salt. Set aside. In a separate bowl whisk together the sugar, milk, olive oil, egg and vanilla.

Gradually add the wet ingredients to the dry, mixing just until combined. Fold in the tangerines, zest and walnuts.  Divide into 12 muffins. Sprinkle the top of each muffin with about a 1/2 tsp of raw sugar. Bake for 18 to 20 minutes or until muffins are browned and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Cool and remove from pan. 

 
Page Tangerine Walnut Muffins Recipe | Fake Food Free
 Thanks for reading! All images and content are the property of Fake Food Free unless otherwise stated. Please do not republish full recipes and images without written permission. What is okay? Feel free to Pin images, share links to my posts or share the photo in a round up post with the title of this recipe and a link back to the post. Confused about copyright and food blogs? Here is some helpful information on Recipe Attribution. If you want to use a photo or full recipe, just ask. I’m sure we can work something out. 

Pumpkin Stuffing Loaves Recipe

October 24, 2012
If you love pumpkin this stuffing is a must! It’s packed with seasonal flavors and then baked into loaves for easy serving. 
 
Pumpkin Stuffing Loaves | Fake Food Free
 
I realize that it’s not even Halloween yet, but my brain has already jumped ahead to Thanksgiving. All I can think about is cranberry sauce, pumpkin pie and stuffing. Now, this may be because I read way too many food blogs and food magazines, but I like to think it’s simply because I’m in the holiday spirit a little early!
 

Despite my timing, I thought I should start thinking about this year’s stuffing, and get in a practice round or two. I like to do something just a little different every year, and this time around I mixed things up in both flavor and shape. 

 

If you’ve already done stuffing in the bird, stuffing baked in a casserole dish and stuffing in a muffin pan, try this – stuffing in mini loaf pans.  If you like your stuffing a little on the drier side (like I do), these are perfect. 

 

The small portions dry out a bit faster and leave plenty of crispy edges. You can then slice off servings and it gives a little something different to the presentation.  If you happen to have any leftovers, the little loaves make fridge and freezer storing super easy. 

 

 Pumpkin Stuffing Loaves | Fake Food Free

 
 
 
I am way behind in my pumpkin use this year so that’s what I decided to add to the stuffing, giving it a seasonal twist. It doesn’t have to be pumpkin, though. It can be any puree of winter squash.
 

For the bread I used a whole wheat variety full of nuts and seeds that I get at the local Great Harvest. This made the stuffing even more flavorful! Just let the bread slices dry out over night, or you can help them along by tossing them in the toaster. Then cut them in to cubes or tear them into pieces. 

  
Pumpkin Stuffing Loaves | Fake Food Free
 
 
The pumpkin makes the stuffing a little richer, and you’ll use less stock due to the moisture. I used a puree from a roasted pumpkin and chicken stock I made myself earlier this year. 
 

Pumpkin Stuffing Loaves Recipe

Makes: 6 – 9 servings

Ingredients

3 tbsp unsalted butter
4 stalks celery, sliced
½ large onion, diced
3 cloves garlic, minced
½ cup pumpkin puree (or any winter squash)
1 tsp salt
1 tsp poultry seasoning
1/8 tsp pumpkin pie spice
¼ tsp ground black pepper
6 to 7 cups dried bread pieces
1 ½ – 2 cups unsalted chicken stock
 

Prep 

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Grease 3 – 2×4 inch mini loaf pans with butter. Set aside.
 

Heat the butter in a medium skillet over medium-high heat until it is melted. Add the celery, onion and garlic. Cook, stirring often, for about 5 minutes, or until the vegetables begin to soften. 

 

Reduce the heat slightly and stir in the pumpkin. Next add the salt, poultry seasoning, pumpkin pie spice and black pepper. Remove from the heat.

 

Transfer the bread pieces to a large mixing bowl. Pour in the onion and celery mixture and stir well. Next add the stock a little at a time. You can add more or less depending on how you like your stuffing. I like mine on the dry side so 1 ½ cups was all I needed.

 

Divide the stuffing evenly into each of the 3 loaf pans. Press down gently and smooth the top with a spatula. Bake 30-35 minutes or until the edges are brown and crispy. 

 

Allow to cool in the pans 2-3 minutes and then remove and serve. If your family likes a lot of stuffing, cut each loaf in half which will result in 6 servings. For smaller portions cut the loaves into thirds and you can serve 9.

 
Thanks for reading! All images and content are the property of Fake Food Free unless otherwise stated. Please do not republish full recipes and images without written permission. What is okay? Feel free to Pin images, share links to my posts or share the photo in a round up post with the title of this recipe and a link back to the post. Confused about copyright and food blogs? Here is some helpful information on Recipe Attribution. If you want to use a photo or full recipe, just ask. I’m sure we can work something out.